Intel Corp. (INTC). The world largest microprocessor company ran multiple plants around the world with significant investment dollars. Therefore, it is worth knowing how long it took to depreciate its assets. For fiscal year 2005, Intel incurred depreciation cost of $ 4.59 Billion while depreciable long term assets stood at $ 21.49 Billion. This implies that Intel will account all of its long term assets within ( $ 21.49 Billion / $ 4.59 Billion ) 4.68 years, a better ratio than the rest of the companies so far.

Earthlink Inc. (ELNK). This internet provider is second to AOL in terms of dial-up subscribers. For fiscal year 2005, it incurred a $ 47.1 Million of depreciation cost. Meanwhile, total depreciable long-term asset stood at $ 190 Million, giving Earthlink 4.03 years to fully depreciate its long term asset.

Establish clear payment terms and expectations with your customers and have a formal receivable collection process in place. Consider discounts for prepayment or require a deposit for large purchases.

Ditch the software crutches. Software is not a substitute for critical thinking. Break down the logic in the software (how, what and why). Black box software cultivates an addiction for repeatedly mindless subscriptions. Break the habit, trust your logic to reason – you have profitable trades that you thought through yourself. As you “outsource” the administrative tasks associated with trading (e.g. record keeping of trades), do not outsource your brain.

However, if you’re like most people and don’t have the time to read through a mountain of books, magazines and web-sites (or have the inclination to do so), then this article is for you. It will list out the main “rules of thumb” for financial planning.

For example, the cash flow examples is simply a detailed “budget”. You take your monthly sales assumptions and add any other incoming “cash” (loan dollars for example) and subtract your expenses. Carry over any extra (or loss) to the next month until you have populated the statement for 12 months. Voila! Another section completed.

Corporations operate in much the same manner. First, like a paycheck, they generate cash from operating the business. This is called Operating Cash flow (OCF). From this, they subtract their Capital Expenditures. Capital expenditures are expenses for capital equipment and other physical property, like real estate. What’s left over is their free cash flow.

Consider non-cash intensive payment options. Have you ever tried bartering? Make sure you are using business credit cards that award travel points to minimize cash expenditures on future business trips.